Kayaker's in trouble.

General Kayak Fishing Discussions
Post Reply
HookiT
Posts: 572
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 3:13 pm
Kayak Make: Viking
Kayak Model: PRO 400 LITE
VHF Call Sign: ZMQ4712

Fri Jun 26, 2020 1:36 pm

A great result was had in the rescue of the two Kayak fishermen off the west coast (Today's Herald). A good day turned nasty when the wind picked up. I do not know but I would say it would of been Easterly as these blokes were forced quite a way offshore..Top marks for having the gear needed to survive.
Trouble paddling into the wind making no head way at all, yes can happen really easily.
Recently a few of use have found ourselves doing some hard yards after a long drift which resulted in heading back into the wind and currant. I am pleased I have bought a Bixpy motor. Now I do not use it all the time as I do like to keep my fitness up but there has been a couple of occasions recently I was really pleased to of had it helping me out. It is a very good safety feature to have onboard.
Off shore winds when you are caught out can be literally horrible when your best effort paddling into it is hopeless. Always be careful of off shore wind, the sea may look flat but if the wind builds trouble will be just around the corner.
35 years back two Men took my Sea Nymph commander out from Mokau in an easterly wind, sea was flat as. These two very experienced men went a couple of k off shore. After an hour the wind built, by the time they squared away and headed for home it was almost to late. They took a big wave over the top of boat. On the top of roof I always carried a eight foot surf board well that was completely gone. Evan after arriving back home gave the boat his biggest blessing for being such a sea worthy vessel it is the one thing that kept them from being a tragedy.

So to end this, always be on top of your game playing around in off shore winds. Carry your communication devices always.

DocProfit
Posts: 307
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:27 pm
Kayak Make: Viking
Kayak Model: Reload
Location: Auckland

Fri Jun 26, 2020 10:40 pm

*&^% fools went out in conditions the rescue helicopter couldn't even take off in.

If it's over 20km, I don't even consider going out, and I consider myself experienced.

If you do nothing else safety wise, CHECK THE DAMN FORECAST!

HookiT
Posts: 572
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 3:13 pm
Kayak Make: Viking
Kayak Model: PRO 400 LITE
VHF Call Sign: ZMQ4712

Sat Jun 27, 2020 10:23 am

Wow DP did you jump over board ! Read the news report, they went out in calm conditions even the picture shows that.
They were not fools both are experienced in the water, diving , boating, kayaking. The forecast for later in the day was for building conditions . Wind turned from the East to North east ,that in its self can be problematic. The weather deteriorated on them very quickly. Any person can get caught out in off shore winds. Hitting the water with a 5k wind can quickly and at times become 25/ whatever. Remember I said you went fishing in a 5k wind; Shit Happens.

DocProfit
Posts: 307
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:27 pm
Kayak Make: Viking
Kayak Model: Reload
Location: Auckland

Sat Jun 27, 2020 12:23 pm

Ok I reread the story and I was a bit hard on them.

Seems the weather turned really bad quicker than the forecast predicted.

Good to see they were well prepared and it turned out well. :sweat:

Mac50L
Posts: 510
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:27 am
Kayak Make: SeaLand
Kayak Model: Mac50L
Location: Banks Peninsula
Contact:

Sat Jun 27, 2020 3:47 pm

The Herald's story was badly written as they start off, then it jumps to experience, jumps to rescue, jumps back to somewhere else.

Re-reading and reformatting that story, it appears they drifted 8 km along the coast though as written you get the impression they are that far off shore. It mentions just under 3 km offshore in another report.

Started for home at 3.45 p.m. At 5.45 p.m. they finally gave up and called for help, picked up at 8.45 p.m. (PressReader) 8.50 p.m. (Stuff) and back at Raglan just before midnight (Stuff). Raglan is about 80 km away from pickup point.

So 3 hours of drifting south unless they tried to hold their position. There are sand beaches to the south and a walk home. I did wonder why they didn't keep tucked into the shore as much as possible for shelter. Remember the original wind was offshore and the strong wind was along the shore so surf shouldn't have been a problem.

HookiT
Posts: 572
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 3:13 pm
Kayak Make: Viking
Kayak Model: PRO 400 LITE
VHF Call Sign: ZMQ4712

Sat Jun 27, 2020 6:12 pm

Hey Mac50L, your whole outlook on what is written is very subjective. Heralds story is badly written Really ! Anything written by stuff, i personally would never believe a word of their reporting. The report was more likely written from the words of those that were involved.Looks like you reformatted the story into what you want to believe. I would say you have no idea what that coast line is all about. I used to live that way it is not quite as forgiving as you would want to believe. Sandy beaches and a walk home , ha ah yeah right, maybe if you have all day. One K in bad conditions is 1k. North Easterly would of been taking them off shore not drifting down the coast. Surf was not the problem the wind was. New's was talking about winds that helicopters could not fly in, hello do you under stand that part ?.. Can only hope the men involved come forward with the true account of their experience. I know the west coast in that area well.

Mac50L
Posts: 510
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:27 am
Kayak Make: SeaLand
Kayak Model: Mac50L
Location: Banks Peninsula
Contact:

Sat Jun 27, 2020 11:03 pm

HookiT wrote:
Sat Jun 27, 2020 6:12 pm
Hey Mac50L, your whole outlook on what is written is very subjective. Heralds story is badly written Really ! Anything written by stuff, i personally would never believe a word of their reporting. The report was more likely written from the words of those that were involved. Looks like you reformatted the story into what you want to believe.
No. Not into what I want to believe. I copied the text into a doc then took sentences written and placed them in chronological order and re-read it and it then started to make sense.

Example of original item order -
1. They are two farmers
2. A severe wind change forecast
3. Set off 1.00 p.m.
4. They were keen and comfortable on the water
5. A year ago take up kayaking
6. Had the gear
7. Paddled south and fished

Makes more sense 1, 5, 4, 2, 6, 3, 7 etc. etc.

> Sandy beaches and a walk home , ha ah yeah right, maybe if you have all day.

You certainly don't drown when walking home on land. All day? It took about 8 hours to get home the way they did it.

They appear to have been reasonably inshore when they had trouble getting round the point to get into the bay they were heading to. Right close inshore and a cliff you often get an onshore wind and I've used that quite a few times to outrun those who have stood offshore. They are slogging along hard and I'm sitting waiting. And I'm talking about supposedly experienced sea kayakers who have never done any sailing and have never learned to use the wind and the land effect instead of fighting the wind.

Wind and helicopters - the wind at altitude is far, far more than at sea level and tucked under a cliff.

The wind was originally an off shore wind. It changed to one more nearly parallel to the coast - so it implies in the report.

We do agree, the full story from those involved rather than from a reporter.

HookiT
Posts: 572
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 3:13 pm
Kayak Make: Viking
Kayak Model: PRO 400 LITE
VHF Call Sign: ZMQ4712

Sun Jun 28, 2020 12:48 pm

:yawn: :| :?:

Mac50L
Posts: 510
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 9:27 am
Kayak Make: SeaLand
Kayak Model: Mac50L
Location: Banks Peninsula
Contact:

Sun Jun 28, 2020 11:28 pm

An example of wind and land effect.

We stopped (a year ago?) about 3/4 of the way out of Port Levy for lunch on the east side of it. The bay runs near north south, Lyttelton the next one round is about east-west. A strong NW, possibly more west got up and when we launched, found we were in a stiff easterly. It was OK as we had it on our beam for the return to base but what we had and what those in Lyttelton had were opposites.

So why a stiff easterly when the wind is a strong westerly? Because it was setting up a rotor in the bay.

Pelorus Sound - we were paddling back from Ngawhakawhiti Bay to our camp in Tawa Bay with a group of reasonably experience paddlers. We were heading NE and the wind from the north.

We in a double were, she in the front mainly paddling, paddling along easily as the others 25 to 50 metres off shore punched into the wind. The hill beside us was steep and the wind lifted up it at least 20 metres off shore leaving a calm bit close to the shore edge. By Godsiff Bay I headed due north rather than on course as we now had a wind shelter from Tarakaipa Island. Then with wind on the beam and moving more astern of us, ran into Tawa Bay.

So an easy paddle for us and a harder one for the others. The next day returning to Elaine Bay I definitely didn't take a direct course. At one point being at the back of the group looking at something, took quite a zig zag from the direct course and then had us at the head of the group. Working the wind and back eddies.

The same can be done with a tide running too. Paddling into Havelock against an outgoing tide, I was scrapping the shore in every little indent in the coast, indents only a few metres deep but ended up at least 1/2 a km ahead of a a much stronger paddler who was taking a straight line course when I was hunting every back eddy.

This is why I question what they did and would be surprised if they actually knew the tricks of "taking it easy" in bad conditions.

Post Reply
  • Information
  • Who is online

    Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests