Inflatables like the True Kit Tactician or Discovery

General Kayak Fishing Discussions
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kingiFiddler
Posts: 251
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:42 pm
Kayak Make: Phoenix
Kayak Model: Hornet
Location: Mangawhai

Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:09 pm

Has it occurred to anyone else that by the time we've got our 'yaks set up, then decided we want to go wider/faster/further in the few windows we have available to actually hit the water, or be more manoeuvrable when fighting fish, so we go buy a motor for it, then a trolley, then put it on a trailer because we can no longer lift it on the racks, etc, we've got more money into our yaks than what it costs to get a good inflatable with a wee 2-stroke?

Maybe it's just me but I'm wondering if I could adjust the way I fish to avoid sharp things like hooks and gaffs and any spikey things on fish from puncturing a chamber of the inflatable, and then have under $5k into a fishing platform that's better than the 'yak.

Has anyone else thought down this road and still ended up keeping their yak? Or better yet, done this and found it didn't work out and have gone back to their yak? If so, it would be great to know why it either didn't seem like a good idea or didn't work out.

I'm looking at something like this True Kit fishing package:
https://truekit.nz/collections/all/prod ... ns-package

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Hairy Little Dwarf
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Joined: Thu Oct 16, 2008 9:39 am
Kayak Make: Phoenix
Kayak Model: Hornet

Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:34 pm

I have a Lancer with 15pony Mariner. Had it since the mid-80's.
Heavy, could only just fit it in the old Mk1 Escort, took 20 minutes to assemble, 2 bods to carry to water. Killed the car with all the salt dribbles inside - It was already mostly bog and fibreglass anyway... :lol:
Bought a trailer to avoid this, and got the associated hassles with legals and parking etc.
Bought a yak, never looked back and now the Lancer sits in its bags in the garage, spin the O/Board every 6 months or so to blow the mason wasps out. Sold the trailer.

Was naturally paranoid about hooks and gaffs, unfounded. The skin on these things is solid, and I think all [decent] inflatables now are multichamber. Low pressure, high volume is the way to go.

I can be paddling away to slaughter fish within 10 minutes of turning off the ignition, and that's cartopping.

...Want a cheap Lancer 3m? It can clutter your garage instead. :lol:
Don't get me wrong, it's a damn good boat - Bought mine when I saw Deodar, the original one - RIP, had one onboard (Can see theirs sitting behind the wheelhouse here)
Deodar1.jpg
Deodar1.jpg (12.73 KiB) Viewed 494 times
Phoenix Hornet - Specialty Assault Craft

Dad! Dad! Look at his fish! It's way bigger than anything you've EVER caught! - Nosey 7-8yo boy on opening my icebox to father strapping down his $XXX Stabicraft 759(?) - Gold. Pure Gold.

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Marc N
Posts: 287
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:06 am
Kayak Make: FishMaster
Kayak Model: Elite4
VHF Call Sign: none
Location: Birkenhead Auckland NZ

Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:31 am

Yes, cartopping is the appeal of Kayaks for me. I saw one of those hobie massive small boats, that purports to be a Kayak, needs a trailer etc, too heavy for me.

If I was going to go to something that needs a trailer, I'd get a 12~14 foot tinnie and outboard, you can get most places in one of those, weather permitting..
VALKOHAI
Fishmaster Elite4 'yak
Fishing for every thing from Trout to Kingfish
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AndrewRawlingson
Posts: 2550
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:03 pm
Location: Northland

Mon Nov 25, 2019 9:37 am

I've seen all sorts of motors bodged on to all sorts of kayaks, some work better than others, but none seem very satisfactory. There are inherent problems trying to motorise a craft that was never designed to be motorised. The Bixpy system seems about the best, but if you want a boat, buy a boat.

Trailering has it's advantages as well as obvious disadvantages. Saves the shoulders/back, keeps saltwater well away from your car and you don't have to mess around taking everything on/off your vessel for loading/unloading. I can get my jetski in/off the water quicker than a kayak.

kingiFiddler
Posts: 251
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:42 pm
Kayak Make: Phoenix
Kayak Model: Hornet
Location: Mangawhai

Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:55 am

Hairy Little Dwarf wrote:
Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:34 pm
Heavy, could only just fit it in the old Mk1 Escort, took 20 minutes to assemble, 2 bods to carry to water. Killed the car with all the salt dribbles inside - It was already mostly bog and fibreglass anyway... :lol:
Bought a trailer to avoid this, and got the associated hassles with legals and parking etc.
Lightweight, nimble, relatively cheap has been the appeal of the yak for me, plus I enjoy and need a workout. But I look at some of these newfandangled fishing yak set-ups and I'll be damned if they aren't heavier, more expensive than an inflatable, with nowhere near the range of a petrol engine powered inflatable!
Some of those true kit inflatables are lighter than some of our yaks. Well, until factoring in the motor.
Hairy Little Dwarf wrote:
Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:34 pm
Was naturally paranoid about hooks and gaffs, unfounded. The skin on these things is solid, and I think all [decent] inflatables now are multichamber. Low pressure, high volume is the way to go.
Good to know, thanks.
Hairy Little Dwarf wrote:
Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:34 pm
.

I can be paddling away to slaughter fish within 10 minutes of turning off the ignition, and that's cartopping.
yeah, I love that aspect too. Trouble is, unless I drive further to good locations, it's still taking longer to get me over the good fish and in fact I dare not even try to get out to some places I'd really like to go in the yak. I may eventually get out there but I'd need a miracle and better arms to get back, without a bixpy or ICE or the like.
Hairy Little Dwarf wrote:
Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:34 pm
Want a cheap Lancer 3m? It can clutter your garage instead. :lol:
thanks but no thanks. I'm already taking too much heat for the existing clutter. :-)
Marc N wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:31 am
Yes, cartopping is the appeal of Kayaks for me. I saw one of those hobie massive small boats, that purports to be a Kayak, needs a trailer etc, too heavy for me.

If I was going to go to something that needs a trailer, I'd get a 12~14 foot tinnie and outboard, you can get most places in one of those, weather permitting..
I quite like the idea of no salt dripping on the car/ute though. One day (maybe, if ever, probably not) I might get me a new or near new ute (it's for work you see, just for...work, yeah, that's it, must have it for work) and I don't want to be dripping salt water all over it. As I already have a trailer and need it for other things, if I didn't already have a POS vehicle, I'd probably be using the trailer anyway.

But that raises another question - I wonder how many people with an inflatable, deflate, pack it away and chuck it in the back seat or boot/tray to get it home?
AndrewRawlingson wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 9:37 am
Trailering has it's advantages as well as obvious disadvantages. Saves the shoulders/back, keeps saltwater well away from your car and you don't have to mess around taking everything on/off your vessel for loading/unloading. I can get my jetski in/off the water quicker than a kayak.
Good points, thanks. even my stripped down, minimalist yak can be not-easy to get on the racks at the end of a long hard paddle back after a long day of paddling and arms are like wet spaghetti.

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AndrewRawlingson
Posts: 2550
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:03 pm
Location: Northland

Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:56 pm

kingiFiddler wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:55 am
Good points, thanks. even my stripped down, minimalist yak can be not-easy to get on the racks at the end of a long hard paddle back after a long day of paddling and arms are like wet spaghetti.
Haha! I remember being sat on a Northland beach exhausted after a hard paddle back to shore and being physically unable to lift my yak on to the car. A passerby helped me out in the end :$

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Hairy Little Dwarf
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Posts: 7071
Joined: Thu Oct 16, 2008 9:39 am
Kayak Make: Phoenix
Kayak Model: Hornet

Tue Nov 26, 2019 6:42 pm

AndrewRawlingson wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:56 pm
kingiFiddler wrote:
Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:55 am
Good points, thanks. even my stripped down, minimalist yak can be not-easy to get on the racks at the end of a long hard paddle back after a long day of paddling and arms are like wet spaghetti.
Haha! I remember being sat on a Northland beach exhausted after a hard paddle back to shore and being physically unable to lift my yak on to the car. A passerby helped me out in the end :$
Handed over a fair few Snapper to dog walkers and backpackers over the years to lift the Stealth onto the roofrack. Fondly remember one pair of backpackers proudly posing for selfies with 'their' fish :lol: Modded a cheap jetski trailer into a cradled Yak Karrier last year, but sold the Stealth and don't need it with the Hornet.
Phoenix Hornet - Specialty Assault Craft

Dad! Dad! Look at his fish! It's way bigger than anything you've EVER caught! - Nosey 7-8yo boy on opening my icebox to father strapping down his $XXX Stabicraft 759(?) - Gold. Pure Gold.

kingiFiddler
Posts: 251
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:42 pm
Kayak Make: Phoenix
Kayak Model: Hornet
Location: Mangawhai

Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:21 pm


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