How long....

For the discussion of how you cook your catch, post your favorite recipes in here for all to try
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Badger
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:47 pm

...has it taken you guys to become proficient at filleting? I've had a look at heaps of vids and they all make it look like a piece of cake!

I've just butchered...I mean 'filleted' my first catch and it was a bloody nightmare. Admittedly, I was using a kitchen knife as the filleting knife I ordered yesterday didn't turn up as expected but even so I've made a right hash of them. Way too much meat left on and I'm left feeling like I should have just gutted, scaled and baked them.

But I would like to make my own fish and chips so I need to get the hang of filleting. I was alright releasing the fillet from the frame up until I had to work around the rib cage. Also left meat on when I tried to separate the fillet from the skin, I know the proper knife will help here.

So, sorry to ramble on but how long does it take to get the knack of it? I'd hate top keep sacrificing perfectly good fish.

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BFIST
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:05 pm

I always practiced on Kahawai when I was younger until I was allowed onto real fish.

It does take a bit to get the hang of but after a few filleting sessions you'll improve.

I like to go over the top of the rib cage as it keeps the guts off the meat and makes boning easier.

The sharpest knife is not always the best for skinning. The key is getting the knife at the right angle.

You could always make a fish soup out of the frames to get the most of the meat left behind.

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Stinky inky
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:15 pm

Reckon best way to learn is to get someone who knows how to do it to show you. I watched s fair few vids and nothing like getting some one on one instruction. I am known as the balmoral butcher by some of my more skilled mates so I can't help myself!
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AndrewRawlingson
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:21 pm

it doesn't take too long to get proficient. i'm good (i think), but the whole process is slow for large fish. i like to keep the fish cold, seems to make it easier to cut and obviously, keeps it in better condition.

if it makes you feel any better, i've filleted various fish from around the world and would rate snapper at the harder end. the spines, thick ribs, depth of body and big scales do not make life easy.

there's a lot to be said for small snapper, gutted and scaled and put on the BBQ or in the oven whole.
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demigod
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:37 pm

I would say your choice of knife is the key. Reasonably long and thin and pays to be sharp. Practice is also key and just taking your time. Like it's been said probably best to watch someone and ask a million questions. Smaller fish are good to practice on but smoking them enables you to get all the flesh off. Good luck!!
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Badger
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:53 pm

Cheers fellas

JayD
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 10:02 pm

It won't take you long to be good at it. The right knife(few different options), good technique, patience, practice, time, and you will get you there. Don't rush it, enjoy the learning process and you'll be there in no time!!! :y:

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Ruff as Gutts
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 10:31 pm

I've gone through 10 knives to find one I like but its a inch too short |( . With the skinning pull the skin more than cutting with the knife and it has heaps to do with the angle. I still f it up around the rib cage :tmi:

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Pointloader
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Tue Dec 02, 2014 10:59 pm

I like to think I'm pretty good now, however in the early days I was quite the butcher. The right knife - SHARP!! - makes a big difference and watching people who know and are experienced will help a lot.
Rememver most people who cut themselves don't do it because their knife is sharp, it's because they are trying to force a blunt knife to do what a sharp knife can do with ease.
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awondering
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Wed Dec 03, 2014 7:08 am

Pointloader wrote:I like to think I'm pretty good now, however in the early days I was quite the butcher. The right knife - SHARP!! - makes a big difference and watching people who know and are experienced will help a lot.
Rememver most people who cut themselves don't do it because their knife is sharp, it's because they are trying to force a blunt knife to do what a sharp knife can do with ease.
Nah mate my knives are sharp as, usually cut myself because of the bloody sandflies biting my legs while filleting :?:

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mitchfam
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Wed Dec 03, 2014 7:44 am

Does take a bit of practise, but you will get used to it. trick i find is a sharp fillet knife, getting the right angle and take your time.
I tend to start by cutting a line from top of head straight down behind the eyes & gills and then from top of the head along the back as close as possible to the bone & spikes down to the tail.
Then I work along this the top again lifting the fillet as I cut bringing the blade as close as I can to the frame.
I have some industrial scissors that I use to cut the fillet from any bone and tend to leave the skin on 9 times out of 10.

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sk8e8
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Wed Dec 03, 2014 1:45 pm

Like others have said, the right knife is, IMO, the biggest thing here. I've been filleting for over 20 years, and I'll still stuff it up with a blunt kitchen knife.

I have a couple that I like now, same knife but different lengths. When looking for a new knife though, one of the first things I try and avoid is ones with a very pointy tip. I find it gets caught all over the place and makes the job harder. ATM, I think I just have a couple of the Black Magic orange handle knives.
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